The mode-of-action is the overall manner in which a herbicide affects a plant at the tissue or cellular level. Herbicides with the same mode-of- action will have the same translocation (movement) ...
In the simplest terms, a crop growing season refers to that period of the year when seasonal weather is favorable for growth. In the Corn Belt, the "growing season" is often defined as the number of ...
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We improve lives and livelihoods by delivering tested and trusted educational resources. The Cooperative Extension Service is one of the nation's largest providers of scientific research-based ...
We improve lives and livelihoods by delivering tested and trusted educational resources. The Cooperative Extension Service is one of the nation's largest providers of scientific research-based ...
Ringworm is caused by infection of the hair and surface layers of the skin by fungi. It occurs in all species of animals including man. Fungal infections cause little, if any, permanent damage or ...
Sulfur in your water supply is easily recognized by its offensive odor. Hydrogen sulfide gas causes the "rotten-egg" or sulfur water smell. Hydrogen sulfide in water causes no known health effects.
Arrange to have a security survey conducted. Your insurance agent probably performed a limited assessment of your property to identify risks on which to base premiums. But since insurance appraisals ...
Fans are often used to ventilate agricultural buildings. Adjoining rooms with connecting air paths through open doors or manure channels can operate as a single room with a common negative pressure.
George Bender, National Crop Insurance Adjusters Gerry Posler, Kansas State University Dale Hicks, University of Minnesota Jim Rink, Farm Bureau Crop Insurance In the U.S., approximately half of all ...
Wetlands once made up 25 percent of Indiana. Many of these 5.6 million acres were located in the fertile farmground of northern Indiana. Early in the 19th century, landowners began using open ditches ...